Autoimmune Disease

Agammaglobulinemia

Agammaglobulinemia is an inherited disorder in which there are very low levels of protective immune system proteins called immunoglobulins. People with this disorder repeatedly develop infections.

Agammaglobulinemia is a rare disorder that mainly affects males. It is the result of a genetic abnormality that blocks the development of normal, mature immune system cells called B lymphocytes.

As a result, the body produces very little (if any) immunoglobulins in the bloodstream. Immunoglobulins play a major role in the immune response, which protects against illness and infection.

Without protective immunoglobulins, people with agammaglobulinemia repeatedly develop infections. People with this disorder are particularly susceptible to bacterial infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae, pneumococci (Streptococcus pneumoniae), and staphylococci, as well as to repeated viral infections. Common sites of infection include:

  • Gastrointestinal tract
  • Lungs
  • Skin
  • Upper respiratory tract

People with this condition may have a family history of agammaglobulinemia (or another immune disorder).

SOURCE: MedlinePlus- A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health

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March is Autoimmune Disease
Awareness Month!

Autoimmune diseases result from a dysfunction of the immune system. The immune system protects you from disease and infection. Sometimes, though, the immune system can produce autoantibodies that attack healthy cells, tissues, and organs. This can lead to autoimmune disease.

Autoimmune diseases can affect any part of the body. More than 80 autoimmune diseases have been identified. Some are relatively well known, such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis, while others are rare and difficult to diagnose.

Collectively, autoimmune diseases are among the most prevalent diseases in the U.S., affecting more than 23.5 million Americans. They are more common among women, and while some are more prevalent among white people, others are more common among African-Americans and Hispanics. Autoimmune diseases are becoming increasingly prevalent, for reasons unknown.

Some autoimmune diseases are life-threatening, and most are debilitating and require a lifetime of treatment. There are treatments available to reduce the symptoms and effects from many autoimmune diseases, but cures have yet to be discovered. Since most autoimmune diseases are rare, patients can often spend years seeking a proper diagnosis.

Learn more about autoimmune diseases here.